It’s Half-Done Anyway, but Hopefully Not Half-Baked

Close up of female African American doctor holding patient’s hand

For those who have been struggling under the intolerable burdens of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (affectionately or less affectionately known as Obamacare), this has been an encouraging day. Why? The United States House of Representatives passed the newest version of the American Health Care Act with the purpose of repealing and replacing Obamacare.

This is definitely a hurdle jumped, especially since the House was not able to pass the original version of the AHCA. Apparently there were too many problems with it in the eyes of the House Freedom caucus, the more conservative wing of the Republican party. So some celebration is in order. However, this bill still has a tough road ahead as it makes its way through the Senate.

I really was not sure what would happen. I honestly was concerned that the Republicans would blow their chance to get rid of what I consider a law that’s hated by many people and only lauded by a few. Even the Democrats talked about “improving” Obamacare, although ironically their solution would be to make our health care system worse because it would involve even more strong-arm government control.

I learned, through the last episode in March, not to try to go through an entire bill and try to explain it while trying to translate governmentese without a translator. However, I am well aware of one of the most difficult sticking points in the bill – the issue of how our nation addresses the problem of pre-existing conditions.

Pre-existing conditions are a tough issue because I personally believe that the vast majority of Americans, myself included, want everyone to have access to medical care, whether they are already sick or not. However, some Economics 101 comes into play here. How do we take care of those of us who are less fortunate while allowing much more freedom of choice to the healthier members of our society and not forcing them to pay for someone else’s health problems unless they personally choose to do that?

When Obamacare became the law of the land, guaranteed issue became mandatory that, in effect, required insurance companies to cover citizens whether or not they had pre-existing conditions. Then the “community rating” scheme required that insurance companies not charge those with pre-existing conditions any higher premiums than any one else. As a result, everyone paid the high costs of covering people who already had some kind of illness. This caused premiums to continue soaring year after year after the implementation of Obamacare because insurance companies continued to lose money covering very sick people.

The money lost by insurance companies has continued to grow to such levels that over the last couple of years, several big insurers have withdrawn from the Obamacare exchanges where people needing to buy insurance in the individual market have had fewer and fewer choices.

As the House Republicans celebrated their victory in passing the controversial bill in the White House Rose Garden, Representative Paul Ryan said that it is very important that the AHCA not only pass the House but pass the Senate as well.

“The problems facing American families are real, and the problems facing American families as a result of Obamacare are just too dire and too urgent,” Ryan said. “Just this week we learned of another state, Iowa, where the last remaining health care plan is pulling out of 94 of their 99 counties, leaving most of their citizens with no plans on the Obamacare market at all.  What kind of protection is Obamacare if there are no plans to choose from?”(1)

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy also made the point that it is difficult to care for people with pre-existing conditions when there is no care at all. Now the point he was making was that there were areas where there would be no chance for people with pre-existing conditions to have their care covered by insurance plans if there were no insurance plans. Of course, while his point is valid that one cannot get their pre-existing conditions covered by insurance if there are simply no insurance plans to cover them, I would like to point out that it doesn’t mean these people could not actually get care. The question is how would that care get paid for? This is a question for another day.

Although I certainly appreciate the sentiment that insurance coverage for people who are already sick would be very helpful, there are other ways – free market ways – for these people to receive excellent care at a low cost. It’s called Direct Primary Care, which I will discuss at length in my next post.

 

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